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Cleveland homicide detectives using new technology to help solve more murders: I-Team

Cleveland homicide detectives using new technology to help solve more murders: I-Team

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In Cleveland, the number of murders has been going up over the past few years, and detectives are coming up with new ways to solve crimes.

“Our solve rate has increased,” Commander Ali Pillow stated.

To better understand the data, the I-Team spoke with detectives from the department’s homicide section recently. According to the police, 67 percent of the city’s 170 homicides were solved by detectives in 2021.

Even though there are less detectives in the unit, the number of cases that are solved has gone up. Investigators say that technology, like video from city security cameras, helps them get quick answers that help them solve cases. When police hear about a murder, a Real Time Crime Center Analyst who works with the homicide unit looks at the video from city-owned cameras right away.

Detective Sgt. Aaron Reese said, “We’ll talk to them right away, and they’ll fill us in on the cameras in the area.”

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Reese explained that if detectives have the name of a possible suspect, the analyst will begin checking social media databases.

Reese stated, “They’re just trying to get us as much information as possible.” Typically, we receive this information before we arrive on the site.

Additionally, the analyst examines data from license plate readers, traffic cameras, and other surveillance recordings.

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Deputy Chief Harold Pretel stated, “Technology allows us to reduce the investigative timeline, make better identifications, and provide the correct information to the relevant investigators as quickly as possible.”

Sergeant Evelyn Montalvo stated that technology is also assisting in the identification of some homicide victims. She stated that sometimes a victim is discovered without identification.

“We can deploy a mobile fingerprint scanner with clearance from the medical examiners, who are also on the scene,” Montalvo added. “We receive immediate identification, which is useful so that we can immediately notify the family member.”

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Sgt. Teresa Gomez stated that modifications in the assignment of cases to the 22 homicide detectives are also aiding in the management of the enormous caseload.

“Everything is now completely computerized,” added Gomez. “Because everything is done online, it is simpler for everyone to access from their laptops.”

Pillow noted that Cleveland’s homicide unit investigators are “the best.”

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“Technology has played a significant role, but humans are the driving force,” Pillow remarked. “We work with some remarkable individuals.”


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Technology

Twitter is working on an encrypted Video Chat feature

Elon Musk says he wants ‘Twitter 2.0’ to have video chat, voice calls, and encrypted DMs — and has enlisted the help of Signal’s founder

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Elon Musk informed staff of Twitter that he intends to integrate secure direct messaging, video and voice calling tools, and more into the social media network.

Musk made a presentation at the company’s headquarters in San Francisco, which was dubbed “Twitter 2.0,” and included slides. He used the phrase for the first time on Wednesday of last week, when he sent the staff a threat that if they did not work “very hardcore,” they would be fired.

He also mentioned that one of his goals was to implement voice and video chat within direct messages, which is already a function of Facebook and WhatsApp.

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Musk highlighted how Twitter may provide encrypted calls without requiring users to reveal their phone numbers, similar to how Signal works.

This is a developing story that will be updated when more information is available.


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