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World Health Organization declared Monkeypox a global emergency

The World Health Organization has declared a global emergency due to the spread of monkeypox, which has occurred in more than 70 countries.

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The World Health Organization has declared a global emergency due to the spread of monkeypox, which has occurred in more than 70 countries.

According to Dr. Tedros Adhanmon Ghebreyesus, the probability of individuals in Europe contracting the virus is “high.”

Dr. Tedros reported that the monkeypox virus has now spread to more than 75 nations, affected more than 16,000 people, and claimed the lives of five of them.

“Because the outbreak is changing, I called the committee back together on Thursday of this week to look at the latest information and tell me what to do,” he said.

The WHO has determined that the risk of monkeypox is moderate worldwide and in all regions, with the exception of the European region, where we have determined that the risk is high, according to him. However, the committee initially “was unable to reach a consensus” on whether to declare a global emergency.

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Even though there was still a “low danger” that the virus would spread as more people traveled, he said that there was a “clear risk” of future worldwide transmission.

At a news conference earlier today, Dr. Tedros stated, “In short, we have an outbreak that has moved over the world swiftly, through new routes of transmission, about which we understand too little, and which satisfies the requirements in the International Health Regulations.”

In May, there were outbreaks all over the world, and experts are still trying to figure out how to stop them.

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Anyone can get sick, but it’s more likely if you’ve been close to or had sexual contact with someone who has symptoms.

Historically, symptoms of monkeypox have included a high temperature, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, and aches and pains in the muscles.

A rash appears after the symptoms, first on the person’s face or mouth and moving to other areas of their body, especially the hands and feet.

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In other more recent instances, however, patients first noticed a rash in their mouth, around their genitalia, or on their anus.

In addition, some patients did not develop extensive rashes but rather dispersed or localized lesions in portions of their bodies other than their face, hands, or feet.


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Young Americans use more marijuana and hallucinogens than ever, says NIH

According to a report that was just released this week by the National Institutes of Health, the rate at which young adults in the United States use marijuana and other hallucinogenic substances is higher than it has ever been, while they are taking fewer opioids.

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According to the findings of the study, the number of young people in the United States who use opioids has been on the decline in recent years.

According to a report that was just released this week by the National Institutes of Health, the rate at which young adults in the United States use marijuana and other hallucinogenic substances is higher than it has ever been, while they are taking fewer opioids.

The percentage of people in the United States aged 19 to 30 who have reported consuming marijuana within the past month grew to 29% in 2021, up from 21% in 2016 and just 17% in 2011. This represents a significant increase from those earlier years. Marijuana use on a daily basis has nearly doubled over the course of the last decade, with 11% of young adults indicating that they use marijuana on a daily basis in 2021, as compared to 6% in 2011.

Additionally, there has been a growth in the consumption of hallucinogens such as psilocybin mushrooms, LSD, mescaline, and peyote, amongst others. The percentage of young adults who admitted to having used hallucinogens rose to 8% in 2018, from 5% in 2016 and 3% in 2011, respectively. MDMA, also known by its street name ecstasy, is the only psychedelic whose use has been on the decline.

In the meantime, the use of opioids has been steadily decreasing during the past few years. In 2021,.2% of young adults were reported to have used heroin, which is nearly half of the.4% of young adults who admitted to using heroin in 2011. Over the past ten years, there has been a general decrease in the number of young adults who use prescription opioids such as Vicodin and OxyContin.

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Dr. Nora Volkow, who is in charge of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, said in a statement, “We need to know more about how young adults use drugs like marijuana and hallucinogens and what the health effects are of taking different amounts and types of these drugs.”

“Young adults are at a crucial point in their lives and are getting better at making smart decisions,” she said. “It is important for the next generation to be successful that they understand how drug use can affect the choices they make when they are young adults.”

Even though young adults are using opioids less, the number of overdose deaths is at a record high. This is thought to be because of synthetic opioids like fentanyl.

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More than 107,000 people in the United States passed away as a result of a drug overdose in 2018, which is the greatest number ever recorded and a significant increase from the 93,655 people who passed away in 2020.

The CDC says that 71,238 drug overdose deaths last year were caused by fentanyl. This is up from 57,834 deaths in 2020.


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